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LIBERTY STATE PARK - WE WELCOME THE WORLD TO LIBERTY STATE PARK FOR ITS VIEW AND BEAUTY. WE WELCOME YOU TO WALK ALONG OUR GREAT LIBERTY WALK WAY OVER LOOKING THE HUDSON RIVER, TAKING IN ELLIS ISLAND, THE STATUE OF LIBERTY AND THE NYC SKYLINE. STOP IN AND SEE OUR MAGNIFICENT CENTRAL RAILROAD TERMINAL AND TAKE A FERRY TO ELLIS ISLAND OR VISIT THE STATUE OF LIBERTY. THEN ENJOY THE NEW LIBERTY SCIENCE CENTER. PLEASE EXPLORE THIS WEB PAGE IN DETAIL AND FIND THE MANY HIDDEN SECRETS OF LIBERTY STATE PARK.

  History of

Liberty State Park

 

The Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island Photos

On the New York Harbor, less than 2,000 feet from the Statue of Liberty, Liberty State Park has served a vital role in the development of New Jersey's metropolitan region and the history of the nation.

During the 19th and early 20th centuries the area that is now Liberty State Park was a major waterfront industrial area with an extensive freight and passenger transportation network. This network became the lifeline of New York City and the harbor area. The heart of this transportation network was the Central Railroad of New Jersey Terminal (CRRNJ), located in the northern portion of the park. The CRRNJ Terminal stands with the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island to unfold one of this nation's most dramatic stories: the immigration of northern, southern, and eastern Europeans into the United States. After being greeted by the Statue of Liberty and processed at Ellis Island, these immigrants purchased tickets and boarded trains, at the CRRNJ Terminal, that took them to their new homes throughout the United States. The Terminal served these immigrants as the gateway to the realization of their hopes and dreams of a new life in America.

Today, Liberty State Park continues to serve a vital role in the New York Harbor area. As the railroads and industry declined, the land was abandoned and became a desolate dump site. With the development of Liberty State Park came a renaissance of the waterfront. Land with decaying buildings, overgrown tracks and piles of debris was transformed into a modern urban state park. The park was formerly opened on Flag Day, June 14, 1976, as New Jersey's bicentennial gift to the nation. Most of this 1,122 acre park is open space with approximately 300 acres developed for public recreation.

 

Grove of Rememberance Ceremony 
Arbor Day 2003  - Friday, April 25, 2003
Liberty State Park, Jersey City, NJ

Remarks by Sam Pesin, Pres.
 

As the pres. of The Friends and the son of Morris Pesin, the ďfatherĒ of LSP, I express deep gratitude to the NJ Tree Foundation, its exec.dir. Lisa Simms who conceived the idea for GOR, the DEPís Mike DíErrico from the Forestry Service and Frank Gallagher, from P& F, & the Grove Committee.

This Grove of Remembrance (GOR) is a powerful living tribute to NJís 691 victims of 9/11. The Grove is a natural sanctuary which will inspire reflection and hope for generations to come. As the sun, rain, and earth will nourish the trees, the GOR will nourish our spirits.

LSP is sacred ground because of its closeness to Lady Liberty and Ellis Island, and because
this green park is scarce open space in this concrete densely populated region. The role the park played on 9/11 as an evacuation center for 1000s of people, the compassionate work of park employees  on that sad day, and the parkís becoming NJís Victimsí Assistance Center, all make LSP an even more sacred NJ and American public park. The GOR radiates with the beauty of sacredness.

Someone once said that groves of trees were Godís first temples. The parkís natural beauty, peacefulness, and free open space constantly inspire reflection on our lives and connects with our soul. The GOR makes the park an even richer spiritual resource.

The Park is a backdrop for a historic Gateway to America and the GOR will open a Gateway
to our hearts. The GOR is a meaningful addition to LSP, which is among our nationís most
special places, comparable to Washington DCís National Mall between the Washington Monument and the Lincolnís Memorial. The Grove makes this park an even more special place.

This park is the Peopleís Park. Caring citizens have put democracy into action many times to defend this free park against commercialization threats. Lady Liberty and her torch sparks feelings about freedom and democracy and Ellis Island evokes the memory of the hardships endured by the millions who immigrated here. The GOR makes the park an even stronger symbol of our nationís democracy, values, and dreams.

This is a great addition to LSPís beauty and majesty. It creates an attractive Northern entrance, and softens our approach to the empty skyline up the cobblestone road.  I also want to thank the Prudential Foundation for their generous donation for the landscaping, grass & paths around GOR. 

This park is a green oasis for people to enjoy relaxation, recreation, nature, history, and mostly free cultural events. The GOR will increase the parkís great value as a family park and community space. People of all ages, of all cultural backgrounds, and from around our state, nation, and world will gather in the presence of these trees, and be stronger for doing so. 

The attack of 9/11, must ultimately lead to bringing the people of the world together. The GOR which millions of people will see must become a bridge from the darkness and pain of 9/11 to a future better world. The GOR is a place of sorrow and hope and is also a call to action. The leaves of these quiet trees call out to us about our moral obligation of conscience to remember the NJ victims and all who perished, and the trees also call out to each of us about our responsibility to work in our communities for a more loving, just and peaceful world. Thank you again, NJ Tree Foundation, for this Grove, whose symbolism and life enriches this treasured park and enriches our souls.